CONSULTING

Getting Your Business Ahead

OVERWHELMED 

by millions of options

using AI to solve 

real world problems and create YOUR own

AI Blockbuster Business? 

MOST ENTREPRENEURS

 using their gut to surf through many opportunities, waiting the ultimate use case

to present itself, waisting their valuable lifetime

on trial and error.

STOP GUESSING, START KNOWING

We help entrepreneurs

to build an 
AI blockbuster business around their personal brand.
  

HEIKO SCHMIDT

I’m a serial entrepreneur and AI monetization expert on a mission

to apply advanced AI technologies to real life problems, creating

new products and services.

 

Although my main focus is in AI/healthcare, I'm also helping some friends and colleagues to make their own dreams come true.

If you’re an entrepreneur and serious about building your AI business without years of failure and millions of dollars wasted on trial and error, you can book a one on one discovery session with me here.

 

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IMAGINE

You can find a business perfectly aligned with your personal strength, something you are deeply interested in, a project which challenges you to dive in, learn and become a super expert. And while you are on your journey helping as many people in a large enough market, changing their lives for the better, this work transforms yourself, your views, what is important to you. At some point it maybe becomes your life mission.

And everyone you can help with your service or product makes you proud. You feel the satisfaction and you want more. You are now driven to grow your success, you live and breath it, can't stop it.

With that energy, your skills and your extreme focus you even start enjoying to fight roadblocks and you transform to a super-expert.
People admire you for your resistance, your motivation, your discipline and eventually for your ultimate success.

You are able to move employees, investors, partners, clients and customers to join you on your mission. And the movement grows larger, day by day.

Your family is happy. After all the sacrifices they had to make to support your dream, to cut back on everything - no quality family time, vacations, Christmas presents, nor funds for college education -
just to give this dream of yours a chance...

has finally paid off.

And with your super exit, you can now provide financial stability and a good life for generations to come.


 

THE REALITY

Iooks different and the facts are stark and not encouraging:

      

Because there are literally millions of choices, "trial and error" is not sufficient neither leads to a super successful business.
That is why only 1 out of 1,000 companies ever make it to broad
market appeal and success, hit a huge valuation, and become the darling of Sand Hill Road. 

    

Most of us will waste their lifetime, don't create the impact and the recognition they deserve.

 

How I Turned Ideas into Innovative Products

There are many possible ways to innovate or build businesses. And there are theories about categories of people who drive that process.

There was one I heard in the podcast, “Inventors, Imitators, and Idiots.” According to this theory, inventors create and drive the actual innovation, but then imitators, who have the better connections and financial background, bring that to the market. Although, inventors sometimes make some small money, imitators collect most of the profits. That leaves the idiots, who arrive too late to grab a significant market share but do it anyway, albeit with no success.

I’m not sure what category I would fit in but as a serial entrepreneur who built 16 companies in Europe, Japan, Australia and the US, I have had my fair share of trial and error within all these categories. Yet, I had never thought about it that way or categorized it as such.

When I was 5 years old, my parents, classical musicians in a well known symphony orchestra in Germany, started teaching me to play the piano. Like most students, I played pieces by the most popular composers such as Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, Chopin, and even Gershwin. By the age of 6 I had additional lessons in music theory, learning about the structure of a music composition, and how the patterns are combined.
Interestingly, the more I knew about it, the larger my creative impulses became to play with these patterns and come up with something more personalized to my taste.

In music, such an impulse is called “improvising.” However, my teachers didn’t like it and tried to refocus me onto spending my rehearsal time to improve my interpretation of the “old masters.” But I couldn’t help myself. I had been overwhelmed by a flood of ideas on how to compose music in a different way.Interestingly, the more I knew about it, the larger my creative impulses became to play with these patterns and come up with something more personalized to my taste.

Just to clarify. I was not creating a new bicycle like Arnold Schoenberg’s twelve tone theory, who tried to mess with the harmony structure itself to create something really new. It was more a tailoring of music patterns to what I personally liked at the time.

 

Following 20 years of renowned music and science education, I started to define “innovation” as a 90/10 rule.

Just to clarify. I was not creating a new bicycle like Arnold Schoenberg’s twelve tone theory, who tried to mess with the harmony structure itself to create something really new. It was more a tailoring of music patterns to what I personally liked at the time.

 

Following 20 years of renowned music and science education, I started to define “innovation” as a 90/10 rule.

How I Turned Ideas into Innovative Products

There are many possible ways to innovate or build businesses. And there are theories about categories of people who drive that process.

There was one I heard in the podcast, “Inventors, Imitators, and Idiots.” According to this theory, inventors create and drive the actual innovation, but then imitators, who have the better connections and financial background, bring that to the market. Although, inventors sometimes make some small money, imitators collect most of the profits. That leaves the idiots, who arrive too late to grab a significant market share but do it anyway, albeit with no success. 

 

I’m not sure what category I would fit in but as a serial entrepreneur who built 16 companies in Europe, Japan, Australia and the US, I have had my fair share of trial and error within all these categories. Yet, I had never thought about it that way or categorized it as such.

When I was 5 years old, my parents, classical musicians in a well known symphony orchestra in Germany, started teaching me to play the piano. Like most students, I played pieces by the most popular composers such as Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, Chopin, and even Gershwin. By the age of 6 I had additional lessons in music theory, learning about the structure of a music composition, and how the patterns are combined.
 

Interestingly, the more I knew about it, the larger my creative impulses became to play with these patterns and come up with something more personalized to my taste.

In music, such an impulse is called “improvising.” However, my teachers didn’t like it and tried to refocus me onto spending my rehearsal time to improve my interpretation of the “old masters.” But I couldn’t help myself. I had been overwhelmed by a flood of ideas on how to compose music in a different way.Interestingly, the more I knew about it, the larger my creative impulses became to play with these patterns and come up with something more personalized to my taste.

Just to clarify. I was not creating a new bicycle like Arnold Schoenberg’s twelve tone theory, who tried to mess with the harmony structure itself to create something really new. It was more a tailoring of music patterns to what I personally liked at the time.

 

Following 20 years of renowned music and science education, I started to define “innovation” as a 90/10 rule.

"The sat from a tape recorder to a "Walkman" has built the Sony empire"

You take 90% of things everyone knows and likes and add 10% new elements to it. This is significantly different enough (on a psychological level of perception) to draw the attention of the consumer but still remain in the framework of mainstream. 

 

By the age of 25 and still in my senior year at university, I wrote and produced my first song, which ended up as a top 10 hit on the radio.

It hadn’t sold many records but was very popular nonetheless. It consisted of a wild combination of existing music elements, transformed into something different. By today’s standards, that is not really rocket science or something that noteworthy, but it did teach me many valuable lessons.

As I’m a consistent type of person, that learning helped me a few years later to combine elements from classical music, hip hop/rep music and pop to create “Everything’s gonna be alright”, a #1 hit song in many countries, the most played wedding song in Japan, selling more than 50 million copies to date.

After university I started my professional career as TV producer and executive producer at ZDF, Europe’s largest TV station. I championed the same idea here. Creating new TV show formats using existing and successful elements of TV entertainment and adding, what I called, “Zeitgeist” elements. By having high ratings in specific socio-demographics and age groups, one could learn the patterns of what interests and moves that specific group. Then, structure the elements in a way to suit the interests and likes of that group and add 10% innovative elements to keep them interested.

When I left ZDF to start my own TV Production company, I made a mistake and broke that rule. As a new entrepreneur, and without the big structure of a well known TV brand like ZDF, I thought I needed to be super innovative and set my company brand apart from others in that way.

We developed TV show formats involving a lot of new technologies, user generated content, and fresh ideas for the desired target audience of 14 to 29 years old (that is the age humans are building their consumer brand preferences and most likely stick with it for the rest of their lives, and therefore consumer brands want to maximize advertising within this age group).

And to tell the truth, we completely failed. No one really cared or paid attention.

Almost 10 years later, our show formats were then adapted from internet websites who could engage a much younger audience and build massive business and commerce based off of these ideas and formats.

My lesson: We were too early to get mass acceptance and a mix of 80% innovation and 20% common patterns just doesn’t work, at least not in our case.

Before I started my successful music businesses, I talked with many people on the music business side to learn the business patterns, no one will teach you in business school. I got it, and again, started to combine the multiple elements in a different and slightly new way, to maximize success and profits as well as lower the risks. How?

Rather than signing local talent, I traveled around the US, signed talent over here, and relocated them to Germany to our production facilities. There we did the songwriting, music production, training, and coaching to get them ready for the stage.

The main reason behind this unusual manner of music production was my identification of a global cultural pattern I later called “Exploitation always travels east.” Through analysis of the data, I figured out the following: US based talent sold records all over the world, UK based talent in the rest of Europe and Asia (very rare examples had success in the US), Germany based talent in Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Eastern Europe, and Asia, and Asian talent in Asia.

It seemed that the date line was also the exploitation border for popular music and the direction of exploitation goes with the jet stream, from the west to the east.

 

Analyzing the underlying reason for it, I realized it wasn’t the production. It was the cultural authenticity of the artist fans got attracted to. And building a fan (customer) base is always the #1 priority of any business.

The cost of doing business was much cheaper in Germany than in the US, so I decided to shop for talent in the US and relocate to our facilities in Germany. And it worked, along with the system of territory by territory licensing, another unusual part of doing business, but essential to increasing the chances for success and, from an economic viewpoint, to cover production-and-handling costs with multiple advances from different partners in different territories. In most cases, even unsuccesful artists made at least some money that way.

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are stark, and not encouraging:
      

Only 1 out of 1,000 companies
ever make it to broad
market appeal and success,
hit a huge valuation, and become
the darling of Sand Hill Road. 

    

The rest will fight for the scraps,
working 18 hour days,
making every penny count,
lying awake worrying about whether there’s a future for their big idea.

.

ffer. Double click here or click Edit Text to get started.

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